Lost cell phone locators

 

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We trust much of our lives to our mobile devices, whether smartphones or tablets or a traditional notebook computers. But what do you do if one of these devices is lost or stolen?

It’s not an idle concern: a new survey from NQ Mobile finds one in four mobile users have lost their devices or had one stolen, and the Pew internet & American Life Project puts the number closer to one in three . Sure, we know we need to make regular backups and that we ought to set passcodes on our devices. And sure, most of our apps and purchased media can eventually be downloaded and re-installed. However, restoring our stuff can take forever on top of the sheer cost of replacement devices. There’s also the uncomfortable thought of someone going through our email, photos, or social networking accounts — and maybe even posting in our names or deleting accounts.

Lost cell phone locators

The U.S.’s Baby Boom generation has an uneasy relationship with technology.  On one hand, the generation which was born post-World War II is the fastest growing segment of technology consumers.  On the other hand, the technology being marketed to them is in some ways much different than that marketed to their children and grandchildren.  This trend is necessary, as technology will help assist those caring for them — nurses, doctors, and caregivers who are decreasing in numbers but increasing in demand .

Baby Boomers are defined as adults ages 51-69 (born between 1946 and 1964). They are also classified as digital immigrants — those who were not born with technology such as video games or cell phones, let alone smartphones.  Not even their children, those of Generation X, born from the early to mid-60s through the early 80s, are digital natives.

Yet Baby Boomers are quickly adopting and adapting to the technologies which are native to their grandchildren, the Millennials.  As early as 2010, Baby Boomers accounted for just 25 percent of the country’s population, but had accounted for 40 percent of the monies spent on technology.  In fact, Baby Boomers spend more on tech than any other generation.  Given the disparity in discretionary incomes among the generations, this is not surprising.  In 2012, Baby Boomers controlled 70% of the U.S.’s disposable income.

We noticed you are using an ad blocker . We understand that you may have many reasons for blocking our advertisers. At the same time, we need to keep the lights on here, so we can keep bringing you great content. This promotional consideration by Microsoft allows us to avoid tactics that we aren't totally comfortable with, like blocking our content.

We trust much of our lives to our mobile devices, whether smartphones or tablets or a traditional notebook computers. But what do you do if one of these devices is lost or stolen?

It’s not an idle concern: a new survey from NQ Mobile finds one in four mobile users have lost their devices or had one stolen, and the Pew internet & American Life Project puts the number closer to one in three . Sure, we know we need to make regular backups and that we ought to set passcodes on our devices. And sure, most of our apps and purchased media can eventually be downloaded and re-installed. However, restoring our stuff can take forever on top of the sheer cost of replacement devices. There’s also the uncomfortable thought of someone going through our email, photos, or social networking accounts — and maybe even posting in our names or deleting accounts.

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