Android ics developer options show cpu usage

 

The Galaxy Tab – now known as original Galaxy Tab to avoid confusion with its successor Galaxy Tab 7.0 – was abandoned by Samsung when Android 3.x Honeycomb came along but dedicated developers from the Android modding community are still hard at supporting the device as we have received news of a working alpha AOSP-based Android 4.0.1 Ice Cream Sandwich port of Galaxy Tab. If you’ve got an original Galaxy Tab, you may want to try it out after the jump!

The news and ROM itself comes from the talented bunch of folks over at XDA-Developers – a Android modding forum – in the form of a thread posted by one of the ROM cooks: ani55 . Two other developers Angel_666 and koudaxi were responsible for the first alpha build while ani55 added a couple of libraries to the ROM to make the camera and sensors work.

DISCLAIMER: Redmond Pie is not to be held responsible for any loss of data as a result of the malfunctioning of your smartphone in the following of this guide.

Android ics developer options show cpu usage

Android is an operating system based on the Linux kernel. Android is developed in the Android Open Source Project (AOSP). This project is lead by Google.

The Android operating system can be divided into the four areas as depicted in the following graphic. An Android application developer typically works with the two layers on top to create new Android applications.

Libraries and runtime - The libraries for many common framework functions, like graphic rendering, data storage, web browsing. Also contains the Android Runtime, as well as the core Java libraries for running Android applications.

The Galaxy Tab – now known as original Galaxy Tab to avoid confusion with its successor Galaxy Tab 7.0 – was abandoned by Samsung when Android 3.x Honeycomb came along but dedicated developers from the Android modding community are still hard at supporting the device as we have received news of a working alpha AOSP-based Android 4.0.1 Ice Cream Sandwich port of Galaxy Tab. If you’ve got an original Galaxy Tab, you may want to try it out after the jump!

The news and ROM itself comes from the talented bunch of folks over at XDA-Developers – a Android modding forum – in the form of a thread posted by one of the ROM cooks: ani55 . Two other developers Angel_666 and koudaxi were responsible for the first alpha build while ani55 added a couple of libraries to the ROM to make the camera and sensors work.

DISCLAIMER: Redmond Pie is not to be held responsible for any loss of data as a result of the malfunctioning of your smartphone in the following of this guide.

Why is this feature disabled? When I turn it on, many apps and become snappy and awesome with smooth graphics. Seems like it'd be nice if it was enabled by default.

When GPU rendering was first added, it was very unreliable. Sometimes it would be slower than software rendering, and there were some kinds of GUIs that it just couldn't work with. For this reason, it was up to the app developer to test their app with GPU rendering, and set an option in the app's manifest (the same place that it declares its permissions) to enable GPU rendering for that app. The option was mainly to make it easier for developers to test the effect of GPU rendering on their app. This makes sense because:

After further development, when 4.0 came along, GPU rendering got more reliable, so it became the default for all apps: it's now up to the developer to explicitly disable GPU rendering if it causes a problem in their app. (That's very rare now.) The "Force GPU rendering" option is vestigial and rarely used even by developers now, because it's already the default.

Below is a list of device and OS combinations that are certified for running Adobe Flash Player. Installing Flash Player on an uncertified device may result in unexpected behavior and can potentially destabilize your device.

(Internet Explorer users: You may get notified that a script is running that is slowing down the brower. The poor JS engine in older versions of IE may hang a bit while parsing the XML data. If you click 'No' to allow the script to keep running, the data will eventually load. This does not occur with Internet Explorer 9 and other browsers like Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome.)

JavaScript is required to load the Flash Player certified devices data file. You must enable JavaScript in your browser to view this content.