Android locator 4agze

 

Need some help by retrieving *.apk file name from Android device programmaticaly ? Could any body provide some Android methods doing that or even shell commands run under Android to get the file location , if I know just a part from file name ?

List<ApplicationInfo> PackageManager.getInstalledApplications() will give you a list of the installed applications, and ApplicationInfo.sourceDir is the path to the .apk file.

You can also do adb bugreport and look at the output. You'll want to look for <package name="com.app.package" codePath="path/to/the/app.apk"...

Android locator 4agze

Not everyone knows what Google knows about us , but we all know that our Android devices love tracking us. Don’t get me wrong, giving Google access to your location has actually quite a lot of benefits:

However, you might still want to disable location tracking on your Android device for your own reasons. It’s very simple to do, so let me show you how it goes:

In the Google Settings app select “Location” to get to Android’s location settings (also accessible via Settings > Location). You should now see this screen:

Need some help by retrieving *.apk file name from Android device programmaticaly ? Could any body provide some Android methods doing that or even shell commands run under Android to get the file location , if I know just a part from file name ?

List<ApplicationInfo> PackageManager.getInstalledApplications() will give you a list of the installed applications, and ApplicationInfo.sourceDir is the path to the .apk file.

You can also do adb bugreport and look at the output. You'll want to look for <package name="com.app.package" codePath="path/to/the/app.apk"...

Android doesn’t come with a “find my Android” feature, so there’s no official way to track your phone if you lose it. You should prepare your phone for loss by setting up such a tracking app — but what if you didn’t?

Your first instinct may be to download Lookout’s Plan B , which has been the go-to app for this purpose. However, Plan B only runs on Android 2.3 Gingerbread and lower, so modern Android phones will require a new solution. If you are still running 2.3 or lower, you should definitely check it out, but everybody else can keep reading.

Most lost-phone-tracking Android apps must be set up ahead of time. However, there’s a reason Plan B works (if you have a Gingerbread device, at least). That’s because Android allows you to remotely install apps — click the Install button on the Google Play website and the app will be remotely downloaded to your device, assuming it’s turned on, connected to the Internet, and configured to use the same Google account. If the app can set itself up, you should be able to remotely locate your phone.