What is china spy agency called

 

China’s security chief Geng Huichang will likely step down soon from his position after being appointed to a senior role on an advisory panel for Hong Kong and Taiwan affairs.

Geng, the minister of state security, was on Tuesday named deputy director of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC) National Committee’s panel on Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan and Overseas Chinese affairs, Xinhua reported.

The advisory role for Geng, who has reached the retirement age of 65, was announced alongside new appointments for two other senior officials.

What is china spy agency called

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China’s security chief Geng Huichang will likely step down soon from his position after being appointed to a senior role on an advisory panel for Hong Kong and Taiwan affairs.

Geng, the minister of state security, was on Tuesday named deputy director of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC) National Committee’s panel on Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan and Overseas Chinese affairs, Xinhua reported.

The advisory role for Geng, who has reached the retirement age of 65, was announced alongside new appointments for two other senior officials.

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The German, French, Spanish and Swedish intelligence services have all developed methods of mass surveillance of internet and phone traffic over the past five years in close partnership with Britain's GCHQ eavesdropping agency.

The bulk monitoring is carried out through direct taps into fibre optic cables and the development of covert relationships with telecommunications companies. A loose but growing eavesdropping alliance has allowed intelligence agencies from one country to cultivate ties with corporations from another to facilitate the trawling of the web, according to GCHQ documents leaked by the former US intelligence contractor Edward Snowden .

The files also make clear that GCHQ played a leading role in advising its European counterparts how to work around national laws intended to restrict the surveillance power of intelligence agencies.

The Canadian Security Intelligence Service, which rarely identifies security threats by name, makes the frank statement in briefing notes prepared for service director Michel Coulombe.

While Canada grapples with the problem of jihadi-inspired extremists, the long-standing threat of espionage is also a worrisome preoccupation, the spy agency says in the notes.

"Russia and China, in particular, continue to target Canada's classified information and advanced technology, as well as government officials and systems."