Phone spying scandal

 

On September 5, 2006, Newsweek revealed that Hewlett-Packard's general counsel, at the behest of HP chairwoman Patricia Dunn, had contracted a team of independent ...

7-6-2013  · The internet is aflame with the news that the National Security Agency may be spying on phone calls and internet access of American citizens, and the ...

17-1-2014  · Edward Snowden, a former contractor for the CIA, left the US in late May after leaking to the media details of extensive internet and phone surveillance by ...

Phone spying scandal

Montreal Mayor Denis Coderre has admitted he telephoned then-police chief Marc Parent in 2014 to talk about journalist Patrick Lagacé, just before police obtained search warrants to look at Lagacé's cell phone logs.

But Coderre insists he did not ask Parent to investigate the La Presse columnist at the centre of the unfolding police surveillance scandal.

Montreal police have confirmed investigators spied on Lagacé a second time, in 2014, during an investigation completely unrelated to the one revealed last week .

On September 5, 2006, Newsweek revealed that Hewlett-Packard's general counsel, at the behest of HP chairwoman Patricia Dunn, had contracted a team of independent ...

7-6-2013  · The internet is aflame with the news that the National Security Agency may be spying on phone calls and internet access of American citizens, and the ...

17-1-2014  · Edward Snowden, a former contractor for the CIA, left the US in late May after leaking to the media details of extensive internet and phone surveillance by ...

Watergate was a major political scandal that occurred in the United States in the 1970s, following a break-in at the Democratic National Committee headquarters at the Watergate office complex in Washington, D.C. in 1972 and President Richard Nixon 's administration 's attempted cover-up of its involvement. When the conspiracy was discovered and investigated by the U.S. Congress , the Nixon administration's resistance to its probes led to a constitutional crisis . [1]

The term Watergate , by metonymy , has come to encompass an array of clandestine and often illegal activities undertaken by members of the Nixon administration. Those activities included such "dirty tricks" as bugging the offices of political opponents and people of whom Nixon or his officials were suspicious. Nixon and his close aides also ordered investigations of activist groups and political figures, using the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).

The scandal led to the discovery of multiple abuses of power by the Nixon administration, an impeachment process against the president that led to articles of impeachment , [2] and the resignation of Nixon. The scandal also resulted in the indictment of 69 people, with trials or pleas resulting in 48 being found guilty, many of whom were Nixon's top administration officials. [3]