Android uevent

 

The BeagleBone Black (BBB) differs from the standard BeagleBone with respect to accessing the pin muxing registers. The mux registers are altered through Device Tree’s  in the BBB, whereas previously you could use file system drivers to alter the IO pin muxing. If you have a standard BeagleBone and not a BBB then you should look at the old article instead.

If you want to know where Device Tree Overlays come from, you’ll first need to understand how Device Trees fit into the Linux Kernel . Have a look at the Device Tree specification first, read it so that you understand the dts format syntax and some of the layout and meanings of nodes and values, etc. The BBB way of altering pin mux’s requires us to create, compile and activate a device tree overlay. The overlay will only adjust the pins we enter into our device tree overlay. Multiple device tree overlays can be layered on top of each other. In this way, each Cape requires a device tree overlay which configures the pins it requires.

NOTE: If all you’re after doing is changing the direction and/or value of a line that is already configured to be a GPIO line, then you can jump straight to “Getting Some IO” below. This works in exactly the same way as the previous BeagleBone. The BBB implements device tree overlay’s through the cape manager which is part of the system. As with almost everything Linux – there are device files that we can interact with in order to monitor, add and remove device tree overlays within the cape manager. What we’re interested in is the cape manager, which is found at /sys/devices/bone_capemgr.9 Let’s look to see what’s currently loaded:

Android uevent

Each device node under /dev has its own major/minor number pair. I know that we can retrieve this pair of numbers from the device node by means of stat , like this:

But how can we get device node(s) by given major and minor numbers? The only way I'm aware of is some kind of ls -l + awk trick, but I really hope there is better solution.

I found a simpler approach using the sys pseudofilesystem, at /sys/dev you have the devices ordered by type an then by major/minor, the file uevent contains the device name and a bunch of other info.

The BeagleBone Black (BBB) differs from the standard BeagleBone with respect to accessing the pin muxing registers. The mux registers are altered through Device Tree’s  in the BBB, whereas previously you could use file system drivers to alter the IO pin muxing. If you have a standard BeagleBone and not a BBB then you should look at the old article instead.

If you want to know where Device Tree Overlays come from, you’ll first need to understand how Device Trees fit into the Linux Kernel . Have a look at the Device Tree specification first, read it so that you understand the dts format syntax and some of the layout and meanings of nodes and values, etc. The BBB way of altering pin mux’s requires us to create, compile and activate a device tree overlay. The overlay will only adjust the pins we enter into our device tree overlay. Multiple device tree overlays can be layered on top of each other. In this way, each Cape requires a device tree overlay which configures the pins it requires.

NOTE: If all you’re after doing is changing the direction and/or value of a line that is already configured to be a GPIO line, then you can jump straight to “Getting Some IO” below. This works in exactly the same way as the previous BeagleBone. The BBB implements device tree overlay’s through the cape manager which is part of the system. As with almost everything Linux – there are device files that we can interact with in order to monitor, add and remove device tree overlays within the cape manager. What we’re interested in is the cape manager, which is found at /sys/devices/bone_capemgr.9 Let’s look to see what’s currently loaded:

Specifically, my device is a digital camera. I'm using gphoto2 , but lately I get "device read errors", so I'd like to try to do a software-reset of the connection.

From what I can tell, there are no kernel modules being loaded for the camera. The only one that looks related is usbhid .

Execute the program with sudo privilege; make necessary substitution for <Bus> and <Device> ids as found by running the lsusb command:

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10-3-2017  · Android Event Handling - Learn Android Programming and how to develop android mobile phone and ipad applications starting from Environment setup ...

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