Cell phone tracking 911

 

Naturally, the cell phone service provider that you use has access to your cell phone records, but it's subject to privacy laws and is supposed to keep your information safely stored away from the public.

Government agencies can access to your cell phone records (including call logs and text records) with a subpoena if you're part of or connected to a criminal investigation or a civil lawsuit. Your cell phone company is required by law to comply with subpoenas that request the records.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the National Security Agency (NSA) can subpoena the cell phone company for phone records without a prior  warrant  as a result of the 2001 Patriot Act in order help prevent acts of terrorism. They can also wire tap, that is, listen and record your cell phone conversations. Moreover, the Patriot Act makes it illegal for the cell phone company that has delivered your records to the FBI or NSA to make it publicly known or even discuss the fact that your phone records have been investigated.

Cell phone tracking 911

Over the past 12-18 months, there’s been an increased level of scrutiny applied to the various ways local, state, and federal law enforcement officials track and monitor the lives of ordinary citizens. One tool that’s come under increasing fire is the so-called stingray — a fake cell phone tower that law enforcement officials deploy to track a suspect, often without a warrant or any other formal approval.

The potential uses for the information are enormous. Say a murder occurs on a particular street with an estimated time of death between 2 and 4 AM. Local law enforcement would have an obvious interest in compelling cell phone companies to turn over the records of every cell phone that moved in and out of the area between those two time periods. At rush hour, this kind of information would be useless — but if the cell phone network data shows a device in the same approximate area as the murder suddenly leaving the area at a high rate of speed, that cell phone owner is a potential suspect.

Virtually all the stingray devices in use across the United States are manufactured by one company, the Harris Corporation, which makes a variety of other tracking devices. Its other products can be used to conduct denial-of-service attacks on cell phones, monitor voice traffic, amplify the range and power of stingray attacks, and more sophisticated monitoring tools for triangulating an individual’s location.

Naturally, the cell phone service provider that you use has access to your cell phone records, but it's subject to privacy laws and is supposed to keep your information safely stored away from the public.

Government agencies can access to your cell phone records (including call logs and text records) with a subpoena if you're part of or connected to a criminal investigation or a civil lawsuit. Your cell phone company is required by law to comply with subpoenas that request the records.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the National Security Agency (NSA) can subpoena the cell phone company for phone records without a prior  warrant  as a result of the 2001 Patriot Act in order help prevent acts of terrorism. They can also wire tap, that is, listen and record your cell phone conversations. Moreover, the Patriot Act makes it illegal for the cell phone company that has delivered your records to the FBI or NSA to make it publicly known or even discuss the fact that your phone records have been investigated.

Great article, but was unable to locate Part 1 in the archives. There isn't a Nov. 2012 issue listed and was unable to locate using broader parameters. Suggestions? Thx U.